Last week, Martijn received a message on his phone: the travel advice for Nepal had been changed by the Dutch government and going to the North of Nepal (where we are heading) is safe again. Even though we didn’t worry for one split second if we could still make our trip as planned, I’m glad that the Dutch government has decided to change its travel advice. I can usually determine by myself if it’s safe to travel somewhere, however other travellers may not be able to do so. Still, there are some things that still worry me a bit about our upcoming trip:

  1. The altitude: Sometimes you hear those horror stories about hikers having to leave the mountains because they get severe altitude sickness. I’ve heard/read stories of people having to leave by helicopter because they couldn’t deal with the altitude. Just imagine…
  2. My hair: The worst thing about a multi-day trek for me, is being unable to wash my hair. Since I wear a beanie or hat almost all the time when trekking, the hair in my neck gets entangled and in the end it becomes like a birds nest. My hairdresser suggested I’d bring a bottle of dry shampoo that I can use without water. Let’s see if that will work for 17 days…
  3. No internet: Our trek is 17 days and there won’t be much internet connection along the way. When a new article goes live, I want to be able to interact with our readers, which is impossible when in the Himalayas. As our new website will go online November 1st, I’m a little nervous about missing out on comments and visitors, however, so be it…
  4. The food: In all honesty I’m not a big fan of rice, not because I can’t eat it but if I choose to eat carbs at all, I prefer to have a pasta or potatoes. While in New Zealand we wanted to hike super low-weight so we decided to bring our home-made oatmeal from Holland. I’m not a fan of oatmeal either and after four mornings, I nearly had to throw up after eating it. Eating rice and lentils for the majority of time will definitely be a challenge…
  5. The difficulty of the trek: I think we were quite optimistic when deciding to choose the strenuous version of Everest Base Camp Trek, which will lead us across the 5.420 meter high Cho La Pass. It seemed the perfect choice, until I severely bruised my ankle last summer, just four days before I went to Alaska. In case I hurt my ankle in any way again, the dream of hiking to EBC may be gone…

Now that you have made it to the end of my list, I’m sure you are wondering “what the hell that girl is worrying about” which is exactly what I’m hoping for. Please don’t take my “worries” too seriously. All I wanted to do was to attract your attention to the fact that Nepal needs you!

It’s expected that the number of tourists going to Nepal will decrease with 50% this year, just because of this stupid earthquake. Did tourists ever stay away in these massive amounts when Christchurch in New Zealand was ruined by an earthquake? Why are we still heading over to San Francisco where a massive quake is about to hit any time now? Why do most people not want to travel to Nepal after the earthquake?

Our way to contribute is by going to hike as planned and telling the world about our trip. We also decided that instead of buying our gear back home, we’re going to buy everything we need over there, such as a down jacket, waterproof gloves and crampons. Not that I need all of this stuff brand new, but just to support the Nepalese. They need the money more than I do. And OK … because I’m still a women who loves to shop!

If only I made one person change his/her mind about travelling to Nepal for their next vacation, my mission is accomplished.

This post has been excerpted from the blogpost on www.we12travel.nl with the author’s permission. Click here to read the full post.